James L. “Jim” Stallings

Born: 1930 Indiana.  Raised on a general farm of up to 400 acres during 1930 through 1948.

B.S. 1952 Purdue University.  Took Advanced ROTC, commissioned Army 2nd Lt. 1952.

Served in Korea 1953-1954 as Commander of a landing craft (LCU), with a crew of 14, in the Inchon and Yellow Sea area.  Promoted to 1st Lt in Korea.  Mobilization Designation upon discharge in May 1954 in the Reserves: Captain.

M.S. 1956 at Purdue University.

PhD Michigan State University in Agricultural Economics and General Economics with minors in Mathematical Statistics and Philosophy, 1959.  Took one quarter at Duquesne University in African History and Culture and Swahili Language in anticipation of an East African assignment.  Took “Total Emersion” for 6 weeks in French language at Berlitz in Atlanta.  Took other courses in International Trade, International Development and Systems Analysis at different schools.

Served with the Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census in Washington, DC as a Branch Chief and Supervisory Statistician 1964-1968.

Had various types of professorships at New Mexico State University, U. of Nebraska, West Virginia University and Auburn University over a 30+ year period.  While at the U. of Nebraska was Economist with the USDA working on Great Plains projects and an Adjunct with the U. of Nebraska for teaching.

Served as Lecturer and Head of Social Sciences at Morogoro Agriculture College, Morogoro, Tanzania, East Africa. (1967-1969)

From about 1967 through 1989 participated in as many as ten different overseas projects in Africa, the Caribbean and in Guyana, while on the faculties of West Virginia University and Auburn University.  Have been in 24 different African countries and worked significantly in seven of them: Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Swaziland twice, Burkina Fasso, Mali and Rwanda.  Also had a project each in Guyana and the East Caribbean Common Market on Antigua in the Caribbean.

Other information

Interview with Jim Stallings – Veteran finds peace in Carrboro by Meghan Cooke  Read article

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